COVID-19 studies are enrolling.

covid 19 Vaccine Trial 
Those who qualify:*

  • Research Payment Up To $740

COVID-19 in Illinois updates: Here’s what’s happening Friday

The number of COVID-19 cases in Illinois continues to trend upward as state public health officials Friday announced 2,264 new known cases of COVID-19 and 25 additional confirmed deaths.

The state has now logged 202,691 cases overall. The number of cases across the country now totals 5.3 million.

By comparison, California on Thursday became the first state to report more than 600,000 coronavirus cases since the virus arrived at the beginning of the year. With more than 10,800 fatalities, the state now ranks third in the country for the worst death toll, behind New York and New Jersey. In Illinois, the confirmed death toll is 7,721 as of Friday.

Additionally, 14 of Illinois’ 102 counties were deemed at “warning level” for a resurgence of COVID-19 on Friday, with the state blaming the virus’s spread in part on poor messaging from local elected officials in “communities where there is little public concern for consequences or enforcement” of social distancing and isolation orders.

The state Department of Public Health said some of the cases and outbreaks seen in the 14 counties stem from long-term care facilities, businesses, bars and sports camps and gatherings such as weddings or parties.

And the continued rise in cases has increased pressure on school districts, which must decide whether to open their doors to students.

In one case, officials at Evanston/Skokie School District 65 say they have been in touch with law enforcement after receiving threatening emails following a Fox News story detailing their reopening plans.

An online news story reported that students of color may receive priority for limited in-person classroom spots, but the preference is based on which students would most benefit from in-person instruction, not on race, officials say.

Here’s what’s happening Friday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

7:30 p.m. (update): US Postal Service warns it cannot guarantee mail-in ballots for November election will arrive in time to be counted

The U.S. Postal Service is warning states coast to coast that it cannot guarantee all ballots cast by mail for the November election will arrive in time to be counted, even if mailed by state deadlines, raising the possibility that millions of voters could be disenfranchised.

Voters and lawmakers in several states are also complaining that some curbside mail collection boxes are being removed.

Even as President Donald Trump rails against widescale voting by mail, the post office is bracing for an unprecedented number of mail-in ballots as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

The warning letters sent to states raise the possibility that many Americans eligible for mail-in ballots this fall will not have them counted. But that is not the intent, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy said in his own letter to Democratic congressional leaders.

7:14 p.m.: 3.5% of local businesses close to failing, 50% have experienced ‘significant revenue loss,’ new Naperville chamber survey says

Nearly 3.5% of the businesses that completed a Naperville Area Chamber of Commerce survey said they are on the verge of shutting their doors as a result of the ongoing pandemic and more than 50% say they’ve experienced a “significant revenue loss.”

The study is the second conducted by the chamber since the spring to gauge the pandemic’s effect on local businesses in regards to revenue, operations, employees and customers. Results from the first survey were released in May.

The final polling date was July 31 and 188 area businesses responded.

About 63% of businesses said they have enough in cash reserves to stay open 12 months or less if current restrictions on group sizes, social distancing and maximum occupancy remain in place for the long term.

The survey also shows 33% anticipate having to reduce staff positions and/or hours in the coming weeks, 48% predict slower sales and 21% are concerned with disruptions in the supply chain.

“I think in general, retail is doing poorly. For the most part it’s been a difficult time for small businesses up and down Jefferson Avenue,” said Ian Holzhauer, the chamber’s board chairman.

4:48 p.m.: Football showcase event in Naperville broke COVID-19 guidelines, park district says

A middle school and high school football showcase event held by an independent organization on field space rented from the Naperville Park District last weekend broke state COVID-19 health and safety guidelines, park district officials said.

Midwest BOOM Football rented a synthetic turf football field at Commissioners Park, near 248th Street and 111th Street, for an event Aug. 8-9, said Brad Wilson, park district director of recreation and facilities. Violations of social distancing guidelines and face-covering requirements were reported to the park district the night of Aug. 8, officials said.

Midwest BOOM normally holds its showcase event — meant to give middle school and high school athletes the chance to showcase their speed, agility, power, skills and performance in competition to college coaches, scouts and recruiting media — in the winter, but wanted to get it in before more strict guidelines on football go into place Saturday, said J.R. Niklos, general manager for Midwest BOOM.

The event included about 200 middle school students Aug. 8 and about 300 high school students Aug. 9. The groups were broken into pods of 40 players, and the pods rotated through different stations over a period of four hours each day, Niklos said.

Hand sanitizer was available, and athletes had their temperatures checked before the event, Niklos said. Each athlete was offered a face mask at check-in, though they were not required to wear them.

3:22 p.m.: Chicago Public Library branch on North Side temporarily closed after employee tests positive for COVID-19

A Chicago Public Library branch on the North Side will be closed for at least the next week and a half after an employee tested positive for COVID-19.

Staff who were in close contact with the infected employee at the Roden branch in the Norwood Park East neighborhood have been told to quarantine for the next 14 days, according to spokeswoman Olivia Kuncio.

2:25 p.m.: Illinois puts 14 counties on COVID-19 warning list, blames local officials for failing to enforce social distancing and isolation orders

Fourteen of Illinois’ 102 counties were deemed at “warning level” for a resurgence of COVID-19 on Friday, with the state blaming the virus’s spread in part on poor messaging from local elected officials in “communities where there is little public concern for consequences or enforcement” of social distancing and isolation orders.

The warning level designation means those counties have surpassed a threshold for at least two coronavirus indicators, such as the number of deaths, weekly hospital admissions for people with COVID-19-like illness and availability of intensive care beds.

The counties on the state’s latest warning list are Bureau, Cass, Clinton, Franklin, Greene, Grundy, Hancock, Jefferson, Kane, LaSalle, Moultrie, Perry, Union and Will. It’s largely different from the list issued last week, when 13 counties were put at warning level.

Cass County in central Illinois and Perry County in southern Illinois have appeared on the warning list three weeks in a row, while Grundy and Union counties made their second consecutive appearance on the weekly list on Friday.

The other 10 counties did not appear on the list last week.

The state Department of Public Health said some of the cases and outbreaks seen in the 14 counties stem from long-term care facilities, businesses, bars and sports camps and gatherings such as weddings or parties.

Without offering specifics, the department laid some of the blame for the spread on local elected officials.

“Inconsistent messaging from local elected leaders are contributing to ongoing transmission in some communities where there is little public concern for consequences or enforcement of social distancing, banning large gatherings, or quarantine/isolation orders,” the department said in a news release.

1:55 p.m.: Have a question about coronavirus testing? Submit it here and local health experts will provide the answer.

What are some of your lingering questions about COVID-19 testing? The Tribune will be talking to scientists and physicians about everything from the different types of coronavirus tests to various reasons for getting tested to the impact testing has on fighting the virus. What would you like to ask experts?

1:02 p.m.: Facing a no-visitor hospital policy due to coronavirus, Lakeview woman begs to see her terminally ill husband

Christine Jeras just wanted to hold her terminally ill husband’s hand.

Kevin Jeras has been fighting pancreatic cancer, which is now at stage 4, for almost two years. On Monday, after he experienced trouble breathing, he was hospitalized at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in Lakeview.

The hospital has a no-visitor policy because of the coronavirus pandemic. Christine Jeras felt helpless Monday, she said, because she wasn’t permitted to see her husband. She spent the whole day pleading with anyone she could get on the phone.

“He didn’t survive 22 months to go out in a hospital by himself,” she said.

12:03 p.m.: 2,264 new known COVID-19 cases, 25 additional deaths

Illinois public health officials reported 2,264 new confirmed cases of coronavirus on Friday and 25 additional deaths of people with COVID-19.

Those daily figures push the known case count statewide to 202,691. There have been 7,721 with COVID-19 who have died during the course of the pandemic, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health.

There were 49,541 tests conducted by labs in Illinois during the previous 24 hours, pushing the total tests conducted to date to nearly 3.9 million.

The seven-day average statewide positivity rate for cases stood at 4.1% as of Thursday, and as of Thursday night, 1,612 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 in Illinois. Of those hospitalized, 345 were in intensive care units and 126 patients were on ventilators.

The seven-day average statewide positivity rate for cases was 3% on July 14.

The state Department of Public Health warned that the Metro East region outside St. Louis is “seeing increases in test positivity rates and could surpass the resurgence metrics in coming days.”

Among the triggers for the state to impose stricter limits to slow the spread of coronavirus is a region logging three days in a row with an average positivity rate that surpasses 8%.

10:39 a.m.: Young people across the country may be moving due to COVID-19, but it’s less clear whether Chicago millennials are following suit

A recent Pew Research Center study reported that around one in five Americans relocated this year due to COVID-19 or know someone who has, and the most popular reason for relocating was to reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19.

The demographic moving the most were those in the 18 to 29 age group, which includes younger millennials and their junior Gen Z cohorts. Next highest was the 30 to 45 group, comprised of older millennials and the tail end of Gen X.

However, it’s still unclear if the national trend bears out for Chicago, and experts say it’s too soon to tell what the long-term impact will be for city real estate.

8:57 a.m.: Chicago restaurants sue for coronavirus insurance payouts, struggle to hang on. ‘We’re just hoping it’s not too little too late.’

Some judges have started to rule on the central question in many of the suits, which is whether the virus or the mandatory shutdowns caused “direct physical loss” or “damage” to property necessary to trigger business interruption coverage.

So far most rulings have favored insurers. In Washington, D.C., a Superior Court judge this week dismissed a case brought by several upscale restaurants, ruling the city-mandated shutdown did not amount to direct physical loss. A state judge in Michigan last month dismissed a suit brought by a restaurateur who claimed his inability to use his restaurants triggered coverage. A federal judge in New York in May denied a magazine publisher a preliminary injunction it had sought to force its insurer to pay up, saying the virus did not damage the property itself.

But businesses notched a win on Wednesday, when a federal judge in Missouri refused to dismiss a case filed by a group of hair salons and restaurants against Cincinnati Insurance Co. The judge said the businesses plausibly argued the virus caused a physical loss of their properties that could be covered under their policies.

8:05 a.m.: US retail sales back to pre-virus pace — but end of relief payments may bring slowdown

Americans increased their retail purchases by 1.2% in July, with solid gains in appliances and clothing, restoring sales to their level before the viral pandemic erupted in March.

Sales at retail stores and restaurants have now risen for three straight months, after enormous plunges in March and April, when the pandemic suddenly shuttered businesses and paralyzed the economy.

Still, much of that spending has been fueled by government relief spending that had put more money in people’s pockets but has since expired. With Americans’ overall income likely shrinking, economists expect a potential drop in spending and a weakening of economic growth.

6:45 a.m.: Can you really teach how to shape a phrase of Chopin or a riff by Ellington online? Music schools sing a new tune for teaching during a pandemic.

Gifted young musicians from around the world converge in the Chicago area each fall for the same reason: to study at one of the widely revered music schools.

They bring their violins and trumpets, saxophones and cellos for the chance to learn from the masters who teach there, many of whom play in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Lyric Opera and the city’s many other musical institutions. The students — from as near as Hyde Park and as far as Shanghai — get to perform in superb university ensembles, participate in master classes with visiting virtuosos and otherwise revel in the cultural life of an intensely musical city.

All of this has been subverted by the pandemic. Which means the Chicago region’s top music schools have had to reinvent how they’ve been teaching the art form for generations.

6:40 a.m.: You’re a college student planning to vote by mail in Illinois. What if COVID-19 sends you home but your ballot goes to your college?

College students hoping to register to vote in the Nov. 3 general election face extra uncertainty this year as campuses shift plans because of the coronavirus pandemic. Even so, students registered in Illinois can still vote by mail no matter their location.

6:35 a.m.: Evanston school leaders report ‘ominous threats’ following Fox News coverage of reopening that highlighted approach to students of color

Officials at Evanston/Skokie School District 65 say they have been in touch with law enforcement after receiving threatening emails following a Fox News story detailing their reopening plans.

The online news story reported that students of color may receive priority for limited in-person classroom spots ahead of white students when school resumes. School officials point out their approach is more nuanced, and based on which students would most benefit from in-person instruction, not on race. They say the timing of the report’s publication coincided with a rise in messages, and in one specific case a threatening email.

On July 22, the school board approved plans for a hybrid model featuring both in-person and remote learning options. Under the district’s plan, parents can choose to have their students learn all online or return to the school building for four days per week of in-person instruction. The plans were also discussed at a virtual town hall last month.

Board President Anya Tanyavutti said Wednesday that because the district is operating at a reduced building capacity to accommodate social distancing and other concerns in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a chance more students and parents will choose in-person learning over remote learning than there are seats are available.

If that happens, the district will prioritize in-person slots for students who have learning challenges, receive free or reduced lunch, are homeless or who face other unique issues that would especially benefit from in-person instruction, board members and district administrators said. While race is not a determining factor, Evanston’s Black and Latino students comprise much of this group, officials said.

The Fox News story published online Aug. 7 with the headline “Illinois district includes students of color in groups with first chance at in-person learning: report.” It was after the publication of that story that Tanyavutti says the emails started.


Source link

Share:

More Posts